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 Borehole water for ponds

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Marius Bezuidenhout

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PostSubject: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeWed Dec 02, 2009 8:51 am

I see a lot of people are using borehole water in ponds with great success.

If you search the internet it is frightening to see how the parameters vary for region to region. Even here in Tanzania the pH varies from 6.4 – 7.2 in the dry season and in the rainy season it can go up to almost 10.

I understand that in GP borehole water contains high levels of salt and in some areas iron.

Even the drinking water of the east rand contains a high level of ammonia and phosphates.
Go to page 209 on following link:

http://www.deat.gov.za/soer/reports/ekurhuleni/Report/Ch8%20Water.pdf

http://www.minesandcommunities.org/article.php?a=900

Do you need to test it more often? Any special precautions to take into account?
What is your feeling and experience with borehole water?
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Pieter J de Villiers

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeWed Dec 02, 2009 10:34 am

Hi,

My borehole was done in December 2004, and it was tested by Reggie Phillips:

Parameter/Result ppm
Be <0.01
B <0.01
Na 2.13
Mg <1.0
Al 0.02
K <1.0
Ca <1.0
V <0.01
Cr <0.01
Mn <0.01
Fe <0.01
Co <0.01
Ni <0.01
Cu 0.02
Zn 0.18
As <0.01
Se <0.01
Cd <0.01
Sb <0.01
Hg <0.001
Pb <0.03
Cl <5
SO4 <7
PO4 <0.5
NO2 <0.1
NO3 0.704
NH3 <0.5
pH 5.1
Conductivity 25
Dissolved solids 163 mg/l
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Marius Bezuidenhout

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeWed Dec 02, 2009 12:01 pm

Thanks for info Pieter.

What method can someone use to increase the pH of borehole water? I do not use borehole water (don’t have one) but it is always interesting to learn.

Will the high phosphate level (PO4 = 0.5) cause problems with algae growth, or will that not be a problem in an established pond?

I see your Chlorine level is at (CL= <5). Do you add anything to bring it down or is this not a problem with small water changes? People advice people to add something to the new water to neutralize the chlorine but I have seen many people not doing this. What will the best thing to do when changing water?
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Adi

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeWed Dec 02, 2009 12:51 pm

Also had mine tested in Midrand by a lab...no issues or problem there
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Jack Bach



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PostSubject: Testing Borehole water   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeWed Dec 02, 2009 6:25 pm

Hi Adi
Could you provide me with the details as to who did your borehole analysis. I've only been using borehole water ( that is since mid- July).
Regards
Jack
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Adi

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeThu Dec 03, 2009 8:13 am

Hi, unfortunatly lost that data, but they are on the Bapsfontein road, right hand side before you go over the bridge, would guess a few kilometers out. Testing is not cheap, the basics was around R600 a few years back...
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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeFri Dec 04, 2009 8:51 am

I found that the biggest problem with wellpoint water is the excessive amount of Iron.

My borehole water is free of any iron and with a perfect PH, however my wellpoint water (from surface water) has an extremely high content of Iron (off the chart) and a PH of 6.2 which is too low for the koi. Normally, the lower the Ph, the more iron you will get in your water, as it takes up the iron more easily.

I pump all my wellpoint water into a 30 000 liter reservoir dam filled with plants and give it a lot of aeration, and this increase the PH to acceptable levels. I also add a bit of Bicarb from time to time. I am still battling to get the Iron content lower.

The following is a good overview of Iron in borehole water, sourced from http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/water/dwg/iron.htm

Health and Water Quality
Iron is not considered hazardous to health. In fact, iron is essential for good health because it transports oxygen in your blood. In the United States, most tap water probably supplies less than 5 percent of the dietary requirement for iron.

Under Department of Natural Resources (DNR) rules, iron is considered a secondary or "aesthetic" contaminant. The present recommended limit for iron in water, 0.3 mg/I (ppm), is based on taste and appearance rather than on any detrimental health effect. Private water supplies are not subject to the rules, but the guidelines can be used to evaluate water quality.

For instance, when the level of iron in water exceeds the 0.3 mg/l limit, we experience red, brown, or yellow staining of laundry, glassware, dishes. and household fixtures such as bathtubs and sinks. The water may also have a metallic taste and an offensive odor. Water system piping and fixtures can also become restricted or clogged.

Types of Iron
Iron is generally divided into two main categories:

1) Soluble or
"Clear water" iron, is the most common form and the one that creates the most complaints by water users. This type of iron is identified after you've poured a glass,of cold clear water. If allowed to stand for a few minutes, reddish brown particles will appear in the glass and eventually settle to the bottom.
2) Insoluble
When insoluble iron, or "red water" iron is poured into a glass, it appears rusty or has a red or yellow color. Although not very common in Wisconsin's water wells, insoluble iron can create serious taste and appearance problems for the water user.
Because iron combines with different naturally occurring acids, it may also exist as an organic complex. A combination of acid and iron, or organic iron, can be found in shallow wells and surface water. Although this kind of iron can be colorless, it is usually yellow or brown.

Finally, when iron exists along with certain kinds of bacteria, problems can become even worse. Iron bacteria consume iron to survive and leave a reddish brown or yellow slime that can clog plumbing and cause an offensive odor. You may notice this slime or sludge in your toilet tank when you remove the lid.

Actions you can take to correct an iron problem
Once you determine whether you have "clear water", "red water", "organic" or "bacterial" iron in your water, you can take steps to correct the problem. Keep in mind that no one treatment method will work for every type of iron problem.

Test Your Water
Before you attempt to remove anything that appears to be iron-related, it is important to have your water tested. A complete water test to determine the extent of your iron problem and possible treatment solutions should include tests for iron concentration, iron bacteria, pH, alkalinity, and hardness.

If you receive your water from a public water system and experience red water problems, it is important to contact a utility official to determine whether the red water is from the public system or your home's plumbing or piping.

Well Construction/Reconstruction
Depending on local land conditions, it is sometimes possible to extend a "well casing" or "screen" deeper into the groundwater and avoid the water with high iron levels. Talking to your neighbors about their well depths and iron levels will give you some idea of what well depth would pump the lowest amount of iron. It is also helpful to talk to a well driller or pump installer about local conditions and the cost of drilling a new well in your area. The cost of well work should be compared to the long term (perhaps twenty years) cost of treating the water for any iron related problems.

Treatment
The following list contains treatment considerations for the various forms of iron. For additional information on water treatment systems, contact your County Extension Office or Extension Publications, RM. 245 30 N. Murray street, Madison, WI 53715 and ask for publication G3558-5, "Choosing a Water Treatment Device".

Treatment considerations for various forms of Iron
•Aeration: Introducing oxygen to the water source to convert soluble iron to its insoluble form.
•Filtration: Media used to entrap and screen out oxidized particles of iron. Usually requires backwashing to remove accumulated iron.
•Water Softener: Removal of soluble iron by ion exchange.
•Manganese Greensand: An ion exchange sand material which is capable of removing iron. Adsorbs dissolved iron and requires chemical regeneration.
•Catalytic Filtration "BIRM": A granular filter medium that enhances the reaction between oxygen and iron and then filters the insoluble iron.
•Ozonation: A specialized form of aeration using ozone to convert soluble iron.
•Ion Exchange: Substituting an acceptable ion (such as sodium) for soluble iron.
•Sequestering: Adding chemical agents to water to keep metals like iron in solution to prevent characteristic red stains.
•Chlorination: Chemical oxidizer used to convert soluble iron to an insoluble, filterable form.
Important points to remember if you are considering an iron treatment system
When you choose a water treatment method or device, make sure you have answers to the following five questions:

1.What form of iron do I have in my water system?
2.Will the water treatment unit remove the total iron concentration (determined by the water test) in my water supply? (Total iron refers to both soluble and insoluble iron combined).
3.Will the treatment unit treat the water at the flow rate required for my water system?
4.Considering the results of my water test, will this method effectively remove iron? (For example, pH may need to be adjusted before beginning a particular treatment).
5.Would well construction or reconstruction be more cost effective than a long term iron removal treatment process?



My question, what level of Iron is acceptable to koi? and any advice on the removal of Iron, for instance activated carbon, will be appreciated. I am still waiting on the formal results of my wellpoint water and are currently only using my borehole water for koi.

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Marius Bezuidenhout

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeFri Dec 04, 2009 9:59 am

From my test kit:

Water quality results:

Iron level Effects and corrective action

0.0 mg/l Iron level unhealthy for plants. Fertilize
0.1 – 0.25 mg/l Low in iron supply. Wait approx. 3 days before fertilizing.
0.5 – 1.0 mg/l Ideal value for plants.
>1.0 mg/l Iron level too high. Unhealthy for fish and plants.
Conduct a partial water change
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Akio_Asakura



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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeMon Apr 16, 2012 10:04 am

Hi there,

tell me, where did you get your test kit from? I live on a property that uses borehole water with an existing pond setup, so the previous owner must've known what he was doing. I'll see if I can get into contact with him.
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Marius Bezuidenhout

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeTue Apr 17, 2012 2:14 pm

Akio_Asakura wrote:
Hi there,

tell me, where did you get your test kit from? I live on a property that uses borehole water with an existing pond setup, so the previous owner must've known what he was doing. I'll see if I can get into contact with him.

You can buy good test kits from most koi dealer or pet shops. I use the SERA test kit at around R800. You can also buy seperate bottles to test the important parameters like pH, nitrate, nitrate, hardness.

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeTue Apr 17, 2012 2:27 pm

In your opinion, would tap water be better to use?

Please see my pond and links...

I need some questions answered if you don't mind.

Thanks so much for taking time to reply.

http://koionline.forumotion.com/t2884-new-here

http://koionline.forumotion.com/t2885-pond-and-pump
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Marius Bezuidenhout

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeTue Apr 17, 2012 3:39 pm

Akio_Asakura wrote:
In your opinion, would tap water be better to use?

Please see my pond and links...

I need some questions answered if you don't mind.

Thanks so much for taking time to reply.

http://koionline.forumotion.com/t2884-new-here

http://koionline.forumotion.com/t2885-pond-and-pump

The best I would say is to go visit someone with a pond in Cape town that can help you setting up the pond you refer to. Always better to see it in person. Nothing wrong with borehole water but important to check pH and iron.

They arrange many pond safaris in your area and the best advise is to join them and gain experience
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Akio_Asakura



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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeTue Apr 17, 2012 3:41 pm

Any contact details so I can follow them?

There's a show coming up in May I think. I'll go there.
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Marius Bezuidenhout

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PostSubject: Re: Borehole water for ponds   Borehole water for ponds Icon_minitimeWed Apr 18, 2012 8:47 am

Akio_Asakura wrote:
Any contact details so I can follow them?

There's a show coming up in May I think. I'll go there.

Contact Paul, the Admin. I am sure he will be able to give you more info since the people in the Cape have great ponds and years of experience with koi. Surely you will find many helpful hands. Still my dream to visit some ponds in CT and hopefully my dream will come true in the future
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